~ I  am sorry . . .  what the Characters had to go through . . . what The Reader had to go through . . . what The Author had to go through . . . was . . . There are many ways to follow this story, I wonder in what way you followed it. In Ode to Trinity, let me express the three most basic assumptions of how the story could have been followed:

                     I - The Characters' Short Living Story: 

 

                     The most natural way to follow the story; you open a book, and regardless what is hapenning, you follow the Characters, who they are, how they are, what is their conflict, what they feel, what they think, how they relate to each other. The Story is about them.

 

                     II -The Author: 

 

                     A more literary and metaphysical way to follow the story; you open a book, and regardless what is happening, you follow the Author, who he is, how he is, what is his conflict, what he feels, what he thinks, how he relates to you. The Story is about Him.

                     III - The Reader

                     A more existencial way to follow a story; you open a book, and regardless what is happening, you follow The Reader, who are you, how you are, what is your conflict, what you feel, what you think, how you relate to the book. The Story is about you.

                  Keep in mind. This story can be perceived through the three perspectives simultaneously in relation to the flux of reading. In addition, I believe this story can be perceived in more ways, not only three, but that depends on The Reader. For instance:

                  [Lisa approached to one of the doors on her left: "I think they are closed."

                   It was closed.]

                 During this chapter, the Characters walk the tunnel as they pass by white doors on their left. Lisa is the first one to approach to one of them. 

                  I - The Characters' Short Living Story: Following the story of the characters, the sentence: "I think they are closed" could make the Reader think that she meant: "I assume the doors are locked," which then, The Author confirms that idea by saying: "It was closed." The Reader follows the flow of the characters.

Meaning: The Reader believes what the Characters believe, which is then argumented or contrasted by The Author's input.

                  [Lisa approached to one of the doors on her left: "I think they are closed."

                   It was closed.]


                   However, it could also make the Reader think that The Character assumed the door was closed, and confirmed this assumption when the Author says: "It was closed." The Reader could think that it is The Author who kept the doors closed, since he is the "creator."

Meaning: The Reader believes the door was closed because of The Author, regardless what the Character does or thinks.

                  [Lisa approached to one of the doors on her left: "I think they are closed."

                   It was closed.]

                     II - The Author: Following the story of The Author, the sentence "I think they are closed" is simply something that the Character says, regardless what The Reader believes it means. The Author is decribing what the Characters do; hence, being as literal as he can be, he describes: "It was closed." The Author's input could make the Reader think that The Author is simply reflecting how unnecessary the Character's comment affect the story.

Meaning: The Reader believes The Author is reacting sarcastically to the Character's obvious comment about a "closed" door.

                  [Lisa approached to one of the doors on her left: "I think they are closed."

                   It was closed.]

                   However, It could also make the Reader believe that The Author is reacting to what the characters believe; The Reader does not know if the doors are closed, open, nor locked, they become aware of what is happening in relation to what the Characters and the Author share; furthermore, in this example, it is the Character who creates the story for the Reader by saying: "I think they are closed." which then, The Author follows the words of the Characters: "It was closed."

Meaning: The Reader believes The Author is creating the reality the Characters believe.

                  [Lisa approached to one of the doors on her left: "I think they are closed."

                   It was closed.]

 

               III - The Reader: Following the story of the Reader, The Character goes to a door and says: "I think they are closed." which the Author says: "It was closed." By the flow of the story, The Reader might have followed the story from The Character or from The Author, but the Reader has the imagination which makes it all possible . . .

                  The Reader knows the door is closed, but he/she does not know:

- If it was locked or not.

- If the Character tried to open it after she says "I think they are closed." (or not.)

- If the Character tried to open it after The Author said: "It was closed." (or not.)

 

Meaning: What did you Imagine?

                  "Kimberly was not on the same wavelength as the rest. Her expressions gave her away. She was on another plane. She stayed a little behind while the others continued, and then, led by curiosity, she went to a white door and gently placed her palm on it, closing her eyes. She believed the door was locked because she knew it was, but soon enough, her palm wasn't touching a door after all. "Guys! The door is open!" The others turned and ran back to see the big opening where the white door had been, and Kimberly standing with her hand high. They peered inside to the small room empty.

                  "So? There's nothing inside." Leo said.

                "So? The door opened!" Kimberly said.

                "What did you do?" Violet asked.

                "I just thought it could open and it did!"

                "Oh great, do you want to go inside and think that any of this is not true?" Lisa pushed Leo to continue through the door.

                "I don't understand." Henry asked. "Where's the door?"

                "What door?" Kimberly answered.

                . . . "

Kimberly answers/questions directly to The Reader: "What door?"

 

                 Later on, Kimberly takes this idea even further:
 

                 "Well, it isn't empty then, okay?" Kimberly swung her arm across the opening of the door. "The room is not empty if the door is opened, yes? It's a trap for our trust."

 

                 And then, beyond:
 

                 Kimberly didn't mind being behind, as [the] others continued through the tunnel, she caressed the opening of the door and whispered: "Yo te creo." 

 

Art, Music & Literature:
Facundo Raganato

Artistic Photographs of The Author:
Scott Redinger-Libolt
www.redphoto.com

Book Cover Design:
Patricia Gil &
Facundo Raganato

Book Cover Photo:
Laura Mintz

© 2014 by Facundo Raganato. 

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